Last Updated on March 15, 2016 by bvnadmin

[vc_row full_width=”” parallax=”” parallax_image=””][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text]“More than 13 million California adults—nearly half of the state’s adult population—is estimated to have pre-diabetes. . . While the prevalence of type 2 diabetes among California adults increased by 35 percent between 2001 and 2012.”[/vc_column_text][vc_separator color=”grey” align=”align_center” style=”” border_width=”” el_width=””][vc_column_text css_animation=””]This month the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research released a new report that confirmed nearly half of all California Adults are on a path to diabetes.

According to the study more than 13 million adults, 46 percent of all adults in the state are estimated to have pre-diabetes or undiagnosed diabetes. Another 2.5 million adults have diagnosed diabetes. Combined, more that 55 percent of the state’s adult population are either diabetic or pre-diabetic.

Although incidents of diabetes normally increases with age—rates are also currently high among the state’s young adults. Fully one-third of young Californians aged 18 to 39 are pre-diabetic. Unfortunately, the report also revealed rates of pre-diabetes are disproportionately high among young people of color. More than a third of young blacks in addition to members of other minority groups are estimated to have pre-diabetes.

Diabetes is an increasing health problem in America that affects both children and adults. It can result in serious health complications including blindness, kidney disease, cardiovascular disease, amputation, and premature death.  The number of adult diabetics in America has almost tripled during the last thirty years. In California, the prevalence of diabetes among adults increased by 35 percent between 2001 and 2012.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row full_width=”” parallax=”” parallax_image=””][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_single_image image=”4684″ alignment=”” style=”” border_color=”grey” img_link_large=”” img_link_target=”_self” css_animation=”” title=”Prediabetes Rates By Race/Ethnicity” img_size=”full”][vc_column_text css_animation=”” el_class=”small”]Chart: Pre-Diabetes–A Generation in Jeopardy[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row full_width=”” parallax=”” parallax_image=””][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text css_animation=””]Pre-diabetes is a condition in which blood glucose levels are higher than normal but not high enough for a diagnosis of diabetes. People with pre-diabetes have a much higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes and are also at increased risk for cardiovascular disease.

Nationally, according to the report, more than one in three adults is estimated to have pre-diabetes, and approximately 90 percent of them are unaware that they have the condition. Between 1999 and 2010, the prevalence of pre-diabetes among adults in the U.S. increased from 29 percent to 36 percent; while the prevalence of diabetes and pre-diabetes among adolescents in the U.S. between 1999 and 2008, more than doubled from 9 percent to 23 percent.

The prevalence of pre-diabetes increases with age, from 33 percent among adults ages 18-39 to 49 percent among those ages 40-59. The disease then levels off at approximately 60 percent among adults 55 and older.

The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) indicated that pre-diabetics can improve their condition by increasing physical activity, improving their diet, and losing weight. This can prevent or delay the onset of diabetes significantly more than placebo or medication. DPP also reported that medication, while effective, is not as effective as lifestyle changes relative to controlling pre-diabetes.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row full_width=”” parallax=”” parallax_image=””][vc_column width=”1/2″][vc_single_image image=”4680″ alignment=”right” style=”” border_color=”grey” img_link_large=”” img_link_target=”_self” css_animation=”” img_size=”full”][vc_column_text css_animation=”” el_class=”small”]Image: Pre-Diabetes–A Generation in Jeopardy[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/2″][vc_single_image image=”4681″ alignment=”” style=”” border_color=”grey” img_link_large=”” img_link_target=”_self” css_animation=”” img_size=”full”][vc_column_text css_animation=”” el_class=”small”]Image: Pre-Diabetes–A Generation in Jeopardy[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row full_width=”” parallax=”” parallax_image=””][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text css_animation=””]The UCLA Report also stressed that without intervention efforts, up to 30 percent of people with pre-diabetes will develop type 2 diabetes within five years, and up to 70 percent will develop diabetes within their lifetime. There are very effective interventions available, including lifestyle modification programs recognized by the Centers for Disease Control’s National Diabetes Prevention Program, which can prevent or delay the progression from pre-diabetes to diabetes.

The current trends in diabetes and pre-diabetes are troubling because of the human and financial costs. Not only does diabetes increase the risk of serious medical complications, it is also extremely costly to families, businesses, health care plans, states, and the nation.

Experts advise maintaining a healthy weight, consuming healthy foods and beverages, limiting intake of sugar and other simple carbohydrates, and being more physically active all reduce the risk of developing type-2 diabetes particularly among those with pre-diabetes.

Click here to view the full report.

To learn more about diabetes/pre-diabetes visit www.diabetes.org.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator color=”grey” align=”align_center” style=”” border_width=”” el_width=””][vc_column_text css_animation=””]Feature photo: Flickr/Gunilla G[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

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S.E. Williams

Stephanie Williams is executive editor of the IE Voice and Black Voice News. A longtime champion for civil rights and social justice in all its forms, she is also an advocate for government transparency and committed to ferreting out and exposing government corruption. Over the years Stephanie has reported for other publications in the inland region and Los Angeles and received awards from the California News Publishers Association for her investigative reporting and Ethnic Media Services for her weekly column, Keeping it Real. She also served as a Health Journalism Fellow with the USC Annenberg Center for Health Journalism. Contact Stephanie with tips, comments. or concerns at myopinion@ievoice.com.