On November 8 voters will weigh in on the future direction of the nation and whether California will maintain its current political course while also deciding on key local leadership positions, statewide propositions and local ballot initiatives.
On November 8 voters will weigh in on the future direction of the nation and whether California will maintain its current political course while also deciding on key local leadership positions, statewide propositions and local ballot initiatives. Credit: Chris Allen, BVN

Last Updated on November 3, 2022 by BVN

Breanna Reeves |

It’s that time again — election season, where citizens are called to perform their civic duty by voting in the midterm election that will impact local and state-wide offices and laws.

This midterm election brings ballot measures that will determine changes to state constitutional language regarding abortion, kidney dialysis requirements and sports betting on tribal lands. Voters should also be aware that during the upcoming midterm election, all 435 seats in the U.S. House of Representatives and 35 out of the 100 seats in the U.S. Senate are up for grabs. Those who win seats in the House will serve two-year terms while winners in the Senate will serve six-year terms.

On November 8, 2022 all 435 seats in the U.S. House of Representatives and 35 out of the 100 seats in the U.S. Senate are up for grabs.(brittanica.com).

While California lost a congressional seat last year due to the census— the first time in the state’s history — there are still 52 representatives left who are up for re-election in November. In addition to voting for delegates, California voters will also make a decision to keep Gov. Gavin Newsom in office or elect Republican candidate Brian Dahle.

According to a survey conducted by the Public Policy Institute of California (PPIC) from Sept. 2-11, 2022, “among California likely voters, 58% would vote for Gavin Newsom and 31% would vote for Brian Dahle, if the election were held today.”

Incumbent California Governor Gavin Newsom. (source: Gage Skidmore/flickr.com); Republican candidate for California governor  Brian Dahle. (source: wikipedia.com)

In addition to voting for governor, California voters will be deciding on several other elected positions including Lieutenant Governor, Secretary of State, Controller and Attorney General. Across Riverside and San Bernardino Counties there are several local races that will be decided this election season such as assembly members, judges and members of various boards of education.

There are also several measures that residents of the Inland Empire will vote on such as Measure S in the city of Colton, which seeks funding to maintain funding for police patrols to address homelessness, gang, drug and crime prevention as well as maintain funding for library services and parks by establishing a one-cent sales tax that would generate $9.5 million annually.

The PPIC survey also noted that when asked about the general direction of the state, 50% of Californians said the state is headed in the right direction while 44% stated it is headed in the wrong direction. The May survey observed a change in attitude among respondents across different regions: residents in the Inland Empire are least optimistic about the direction of the state while residents in the San Francisco Bay Area are the most optimistic.

Ballot measures As election day approaches, Californians will have the opportunity to weigh in on seven statewide ballot measures:

On November 8, California voters will once again have an opportunity to weigh in on several statewide propositions that cover a myriad of issues. (source: youtube.com).

Proposition 1: 

Adds language to the California constitution that will safeguard abortion rights in the state. While abortion rights are protected by law in California, this measure will solidify an individual’s right to reproductive freedom in the constitution, including the fundamental right to an abortion or access to contraceptives.

Proposition 26: 

Will determine sports betting on tribal lands by allowing tribal casinos and horse race tracks to offer in-person sports betting. Additionally, if passed, this ballot would allow tribes to offer new games like roulette and craps.

Proposition 27: 

This proposition regarding online sports betting would allow Californians to place bets through their computers and mobile apps. 

Proposition 28: 

If passed, this proposition would guarantee funding for arts and music education in Pk-12 public schools from the state which would allocate at least 1% of funding from Prop. 98 (that established minimum funding level for schools and community colleges).

Proposition 29: 

This proposition would require new rules for kidney dialysis clinics, specifically requiring at least one physician, nurse practitioner or physician assistant with six months of relevant experience to be available on site or via telehealth, in some cases. Additionally, the proposition would require dialysis companies to tell patients about physicians who have an ownership interest of 5% or more in a clinic. Under this prop., centers would be required to report infection data to the state. Clinics would also be prohibited from turning away patients based on how they pay for treatments and closing without state approval.

Proposition 30:

If passed, this proposition would tax wealthy Californians to fund climate and clean air programs. The prop. would add a 1.75%  tax increase on personal income that exceeds $2 million for individuals or married couples. According to the nonpartisan Legislative Analyst’s Office, this would generate an estimated $3 billion to $4.5 billion annually.

Proposition 31: 

This proposition will decide whether to overturn a 2020 law that prevents the sale of some flavored tobacco products. A “yes” vote will uphold the current law and a “no” vote will repeal the law, allowing for the sale of flavored tobacco products.

Ways to vote in the midterm election

There are four ways to cast your ballot received by mail:

By mail: 

Once you mark your ballot, place it in the mail ballot return envelope provided to you, sign and seal the envelope. The postage is already paid, so just mail your voted ballot via the U.S. Postal Service. Please note that in order for a mailed ballot to be counted, the return envelope must be postmarked on or before November 8 and received by the Registrar of Voters no later than November 15.

Submit your ballot at a drop-off location 

After marking your ballot, place it in the mail ballot return envelope provided to you, sign and seal the envelope. Next, drop off your voted ballot at any secure mail ballot drop-off location. For locations in San Bernardino County, visit: SBCountyElections.com. For locations in Riverside County, visit: https://voteinfo.net/.

Early voting site 

After marking your ballot, place it in the mail ballot return envelope provided to you, sign and seal the envelope. Then, drop off your marked ballot at any of the following early voting sites. 

Find where you can vote early in Riverside County by visiting: https://caearlyvoting.sos.ca.gov.  

In San Bernardino County, residents can vote early at the following locations:

San Bernardino County Registrar of Voters, 777 E. Rialto Avenue, San Bernardino. This site is open Monday through Friday, until November 7, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Saturday, November 5, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and open on Election Day, Tuesday, November 8, from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m.

In San Bernardino County you can also vote early at any of the following additional four locations, all of which are open from Tuesday, November 1 to Saturday, November 5 and Monday, November 7 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. They include:

  • Town of Apple Valley Recreation Center, 14955 Dale Evans Parkway, Apple Valley
  • Joshua Tree Community Center, 6171 Sunburst Street, Joshua Tree
  • Ontario Conference Center, 1947 E. Convention Center Way, Ontario
  • Victorville City Hall, 14343 Civic Drive, Victorville

Additionally, if you are not currently registered to vote, you can register at any early vote site, to receive a ballot, request a replacement ballot and receive accessibility and language assistance.

Vote at your local polling place 

After marking your ballot, place it in the ballot return envelope provided to you, sign and seal the envelope. Next, drop off your ballot at any polling place on November 8, Election Day from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Track your ballotVoters can track their mail ballot using California Secretary of State’s tracking tool at: WheresMyBallot.sos.ca.gov.

Breanna Reeves

Breanna Reeves is a reporter in Riverside, California, and uses data-driven reporting to cover issues that affect the lives of Black Californians. Breanna joins Black Voice News as a Report for America Corps member. Previously, Breanna reported on activism and social inequality in San Francisco and Los Angeles, her hometown. Breanna graduated from San Francisco State University with a bachelor’s degree in Print & Online Journalism. She received her master’s degree in Politics and Communication from the London School of Economics. Contact Breanna with tips, comments or concerns at breanna@voicemediaventures.com or via twitter @_breereeves.